A thief

About half a year ago, I caught a company in Singapore (yes, in Singapore) who took my friend’s wedding video as their own when they weren’t the ones who were hired for the job. The wedding highlights video which would have the actual company’s credits was removed and the audio came onto an abrupt stop without a fade off. Despite the video being uploaded by the company for more than a year, it was uncovered when I was searching around the wedding brides forum then.

Upon noticing the video being not the company who shot it, I notified the people who produced it and they gave a warning to the company who posted it. Trying to ‘steal’ someone else’s work and call it your own would probably invite more trouble to oneself than benefit. If the stolen work is better than what you can produce, you will be giving a false impression to clients that you are able to do something similar for them too. Bad publicity and reputation will be tarnished in the industry if the original producers intend to take legal action. In the above case, the producers of the video decided to let them off while thanking me for letting them know over a meal.

Do justice for your clients and yourself. You can copy camera angles, composition, color style and cuts but not steal their work. You may just be caught if your clients do google the names of the couple of a stolen video that you uploaded to ask for second opinion.

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